Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

a woman wondering can you die from xanax withdrawal

Can You Die From Xanax Withdrawal?

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Abusing Xanax has several serious consequences, but quitting may bring its own side effects. Your mind and body might have a hard time handling these. Thankfully, you don't have to go through this experience alone. It takes incredible bravery to stand up to your addiction and fight for your life back. We're here to help. At Lakeview Health, we have a comprehensive inpatient and intensive outpatient program in Jacksonville, FL, where we do just that. We are often asked, "Can you die from Xanax withdrawal?" The short answer is, there are risks. But we take every precaution to ensure a safe and comfortable detox period. And it's definitely far safer to quit in a supervised setting such as a medical detox center.

Xanax Addiction

Benzodiazepines, such as Xanax, are prescription drugs used for their sedation properties. First introduced in 1981, alprazolam, which is the generic form of Xanax, works by stimulating a chemical in the brain called "GABA." Between 1996 and 2013, benzodiazepine prescriptions increased by two-thirds, to 13.5 million.

You may shock your system if you stop taking Xanax suddenly. This shock will be especially severe if you're abusing the drug. In this case, the body has grown dependent on the impact of the drug. Without it, the body may react severely. For example, the brain may try to compensate for reduced GABA activity by resetting its neurotransmitter production levels.

Is Xanax Withdrawal Dangerous?

At Lakeview, out Xanax abuse treatment include medical detox when needed. You will receive tapered Xanax doses, which is a safer way to quit than going cold turkey. Withdrawal symptoms start a few hours after your last use and may last up to four days.

Some of the symptoms of Xanax withdrawal include:

  • Headaches
  • Tremors
  • Blurred vision
  • Muscle pain
  • Numb fingers
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety or panic
  • Heart palpitations
  • Seizures
  • Paranoia

Your mind and body might have a hard time handling these. Thankfully, you don't have to go through this experience alone. It takes incredible bravery to stand up to your addiction and fight for your life back. At Lakeview Health's intensive outpatient program, we are here to help.

Can You Die from Xanax Withdrawal?

Yes, you can die from Xanax withdrawal. For example, one woman used 200 mg of Xanax over six days, and then stopped using the drug. She died four days later, according to the American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, reportedly from benzo withdrawal symptoms,

Can You Die from Xanax Withdrawal? Yes, you can. However, with the right medical detox plan, that's highly unlikely.

Should I Choose Inpatient or Outpatient Treatment

Some people have family and other obligations that prevent them from participating in an inpatient treatment center. It's vital to have someone with you as much as possible to monitor your symptoms and seek help for you, if necessary, as you go through withdrawal.

"Can you die from Xanax withdrawal symptoms?" and "Is Xanax withdrawal dangerous?" are questions that we frequently get. And indeed, there are always risks involved when you stop using a substance to which your body has become addicted. However, it's far more dangerous to continue using the drug and remaining in an addicted state. Quitting Xanax suddenly may have negative impacts from a mental and physical standpoint. That's why we suggest inpatient treatment whenever possible.

Xanax Treatment Centers in Jacksonville, FL

Sufferers of Xanax addiction need a comprehensive treatment plan that includes medical supervision and a slow reduction in dosage. At Lakeview Health, you will learn how to set long-term recovery goals and coping mechanisms to resist relapse temptations.

After you complete an inpatient stay, outpatient and aftercare services support your fight for lifelong recovery. The caring staff at Lakeview are waiting to help you. Contact us today at 866.704.7692 for more information on how to enroll for treatment.