Energy Drinks Sending Thousands to the ER

Energy Drinks Sending Thousands to the ER

Energy Drinks Sending Thousands to the ER

  The government states  that the number of people who find themselves in a hospital emergency room as a result of over indulging in popular energy drinks such as Red Bull and Monster has increased ten times from 2005-2009. Energy drinks are more dangerous than coffee because they can come in large containers, and since they are cold beverages people tend to drink them faster than they would a cup of coffee. 44% of emergency room visits that were related to energy drinks had either alcohol or drugs involved. Mixing energy drinks with alcohol has become more popular over the years. People enjoy the combination of the caffeine buzz along with the effects of alcohol. Combining energy drinks and caffeine is dangerous.  Men account for two-thirds of related emergency room visits. An increase in heart rate, elevated blood pressure, confusion, and decreased motor skills are all symptoms that too much of an energy drink has been consumed. These symptoms can be more apparent if energy drinks are mixed with alcohol or drugs. 27% of people who find themselves in the ER for energy drinks were also under the influence of another stimulant. A part of the problem with mixing energy drinks and alcohol is that the caffeine can cover up the effects of alcohol. Studies demonstrate that people who combine alcohol with energy drinks are more apt to get intoxicated and get behind the wheel of a car. Energy drinks are not unlike alcohol or any other drugs. Too much of them can be harmful and cause negative consequences that will need attention such as  drug or alcohol addiction treatment to reverse.